Doppler Effect

   The sudden change in pitch of a car horn as a car passes by (source motion) or in the pitch of a boom box on the sidewalk as you drive by in your car (observer motion) was first explained in 1842 by Christian Doppler. His Doppler Effect is the shift in frequency and wavelength of waves which results from a source moving with respect to the medium, a receiver moving with respect to the medium, or even a moving medium.

    The perceived frequency (f ´) is related to the actual frequency (f0) and the relative speeds of the source (vs), observer (vo), and the speed (v) of waves in the medium by 

General Equation 

For a stationary observer 

    The choice of using the plus (+) or minus (-) sign is made according to the convention that if the source and observer are moving towards each other the perceived frequency (f ´) is higher than the actual frequency (f0). Likewise, if the source and observer are moving away from each other the perceived frequency (f ´) is lower than the actual frequency (f0).

   Although first discovered for sound waves, the Doppler effect holds true for all types of waves including light (and other electromagnetic waves). The Doppler effect for light waves is usually described in terms of colors rather than frequency. A red shift occurs when the source and observer are moving away from eachother, and a blue shift occurs when the source and observer are moving towards eachother. The red shift of light from remote galaxies is proof that the universe is expanding.

Definition provided by  Daniel A. Russell, Kettering University 

Graphic provided by Hyperphysics

 Video provided by DavidRobert2007

 

Video by Khan Academy  

Vocabulary 

Doppler Effect

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